Best Practices, Resources

Little Bites of Cocoa is a blog I recently discovered that offers some truly great bite-sized snippets of knowledge via a newsletter. It’s a good way to keep on top of new best practices and bits of knowledge.

In the latest newsletter, a bunch of handy Swift tricks were featured, with my favourite being this one:

  
It’s helped me cut way down on the pyramid of doom! And what’s even better is you can even throw in a condition using the where keyword to the end of the chain. 😍 brilliance.

Check out the rest here: https://littlebitesofcocoa.com/175-more-swift-tricks

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Resources

Mixins and Traits in Swift 2 (Using Protocol Extensions)

This is a really great blog post by Matthijs Hollemans (author of the iOS Apprentice book I just finished reading) about the power of implementing protocol extensions/mixins/traits in your code to help reduce code-reuse, and make it more flexible.

It is a different way of thinking, but in my opinion, a much better way to code. I’m excited to implement protocol extensions into my app!

http://matthijshollemans.com/2015/07/22/mixins-and-traits-in-swift-2/

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Resources

Learn How to Use Git

The concept of “Git” can be intimidating at first…branches, local copies, merging, committing, etc. It isn’t simple when starting out to understand how to use this powerful tool to its full potential. Figuring it out, however, is a must in my opinion! I didn’t know anything about using git before reading about it in the iOS Apprentice book I just finished, but that was just the tip of the iceberg!

There’s a Mac app called Tower (free trial) that wrote an excellent guide to fully understanding how to make the best use of git. The online ebook applies to many free Git management apps as well, so don’t dismiss it because it’s tied to a paid Mac app.

Free ebook: Learn Version Control with Git

Reading through this free online ebook has given me the confidence to start using Git for my iOS app to better protect myself from the frustrations of making a (bad) programming change without version control and having to manually change code back to how it used to be when it worked.

I’m excited to be more experimental and take more risks in my code now!

Check out the book’s full table of contents below.

Tower's Git Tutorial Table of Contents

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